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Full text of "Anti-slavery melodies : for the friends of freedom"

PRESENTED TO TWEtf fl^Yt2^ 







ANTI-SLAVERY 



MELODIES 



THE FRIENDS OF FREEDOM. 



PREPARED FOR 



THE HINGHAM ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY 

BY JAIRUS LINCOLN. 



HINGHAM: 

PUBLISHED BY ELIJAH B. GILL. 

Price 25 cents. 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1843, 

BY JAIRUS LINCOLN, 

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts. 



" 









A. J. WEIGHT, PRINTER, 
NO. 3 WATER STREET, 

EOSTON. 



PREFACE. 



" Music speaks the heart's emotion, 
Music tells the soul's devotion, 
Music heavenly harps employs, 
Music wakens heavenly joys." 



I have prepared this little work because I considered that the 
Anti-Slavery community needed something of the kind, and I have 
wished to do something to "help the cause along." The friends of 
Temperance say — " The influence of Temperance Songs is no longer 
to be questioned as a powerful means of carrying forward our cause." 
If the progress of that reform is indebted, in any degree, to the aid of 
music, will not the Anti-Slavery cause be advanced by the same 
means ? Let our Anti-Slavery friends turn their attention to this 
subject, and organize in every town an Anti-Slavery choir. There 
are many who have not the gift of speech-making, but who can, by 
song-singing, make strong appeals, in behalf of the slave, to every 
community and to every heart. Let such be prepared for the work 
and labor in their way. The " Liberty and Anti-Slavery song book" 
was published the last year by D. S. King, and the " Anti-Slavery 
Picknick," by John A. Collins, for the 1st. of August. The Abo- 
litionists need now a larger book, and a still larger one will be 
furnished when it shall be needed. From the Anti-Slavery Picknick 
I have made selections by permission. Several hymns have been 
written for this work. Of the authors of hymns, which I have 



4- 



selected, I have given the names when I have been able. % With 
regarct to the music which I have selected I have also given the name 
of the publication from which I have made the selection* 

This little book is intended, in some measure, to advance the cause 
of Emancipation, and to urge those, who have engaged in the cause, 
to go forward with renewed zeal in accomplishing the work of their 
holy mission. I present it to the public, trusting that it will answer 
the purpose for which it was intended, and knowing that it will be 
encouraged so far only as it may meet the approbation of my Anti- 
Slavery friends. 

JAIRUS LINCOLN 
ffingham] Feb, 22, 1843. 



Hymn 1, L, M, 

Words by John Pierpont. Tune — Old Hundred. 






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1. We ask not that the slave should lie, As lies his master, at his ease, 



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2. We mourn not that the man should toil ; 'Tis nature's need, 'tis God's decree ; 



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3. We ask not, 'eye for eye,' that all, Who forge the chain and ply the whip; 

4. We only ask, God, that they, Who bind a brother, may relent : 



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Or in the shade of blooming trees.. 



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But let the hand that tills the soil, Be, like the wind that fans it, free. 



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Should feel their torture ; while the thrall Should wield the scourge of mastership. 
But, Great Avenger, we do pray That the wrong-doer may repent. 

(1*) 



Blow ye the Trumpet, 



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1. Blow ye the trumpet abroad o'er the sea, . ..... Britlarmiahath triumph 'd, the 

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2. Hail to Brittannia, fair Liberty's 



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Her frown quailed the tyrants, the 

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Bondman is free : Sing — for the pride of the ty-rant 



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broken, His scourges- 



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slave caught her smile ; Fly on the winds to tell Af- ric 



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the mother of mourners— " Rejoice"— Brittannia wen forth, in the 

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Blow ye the Trumpet, co*****.. 















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word was but spo- ken, And fet - ters and scourges were sunk in the 

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might of her glo - ry, And slaves sprung to men at the sound of her voice; 


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Blow ye the trumpet a-broad o'er the sea, Brit - tan- nia hath triumphed 



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Praise to the God of our fathers ; 'twas he — Je - ho - vah, who triumphed; 



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the Bond-man is free — the Bondman is free — the Bondman is free. 



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ree — the Bondman is free. 

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Brittannia!!! by thee— Brittannia!!! bv thee— Brittannia!!! by thee. 




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Hymn 2, L, M, 



Words by John Pierpont. 



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1 . Strike from that laborer's limbs his chain. In the fierce sun the iron burns, 



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3. The chain, that binds you to your slave, Binds you to him with links so strong 

4. Then break his chain and let him go, And, with the spirit of a man. 



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By night it fills his dreams with pain, By day it galls him as he turns. 



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An snakes it in your ears, till you Tremble, as at an earthquake's tread. 



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That you must wear it to your grave, If, all your days, you do him wrong. 
Earn your own bread, and you shall know Peace that you know not now nor can. 



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Hymn 3, L, M, 

Words by W. L. Garrison. Tune— Wells. 




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1. The hour of freedom! come it must— Oh, hasten it in mercy, Heaven ! 



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2. When glorious freedom shall be won By every caste, complexion, clime, 



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3. Friend of the poor, long-sufPring Lord ! This guilty land from ruin save 

4. And ye, who are like cattle sold, Ignobly trodden like the earth, 

5. Bear meekly still your cruel woes, Light follows darkness, comfort, pain; 



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When all, who grovel in the dust, Shall stand erect, their fetters riven. 



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When tyranny shall be o'erthrown, And color cease to be a crime. 



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Let justice sheathe her glitt'ring sword, And mercy rescue from the grave. 

And barter'd constantly for gold, Your souls debased from their high birth, 

So time shall give you sweet repose, And sever ev'ry hateful chain. 



10 



Hymn 4, L, M. 



Words by Mrs. Chapman. Music from "Boston Academy." 



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1. Hark ! Hark ! it is the trumpet call, • Rise in the name of God Most High !' 



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2. " The hour hath come to do and dare, Bound with the hondmen now are we, 



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3. Stream forth from all your mountains green,Pour like a flood from ev'ry height; 
4. A mighty sound the region fills, A voice from all our fathers' graves, 



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On ready hearts the accents fall, And firm and full they make reply: 



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We'll pour aloft the mighty prayer,"We'll bend in God's own house the knee." 



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With kindling hearts and voices keen, Swell high the song of truth and right. 
It comes from all these thousand hills, ' Woe to the land of human slaves.' 



11 



Hymn 5, L, M, 



Words by Mary Jackman. Music from ' Carmina Sacra. 






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1. Eternal Father, Thou hast made A num'rous family thy care, 



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2. Of kindred blood and flesh the same, In thy pure sight of equal worth, 



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3. Why should the sighing bondman grope, A cheerless journey to the tomb ? 

4. Wilt thou not hear, and set them free, The down-cast slave, for whom we plead, 



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Nor sable hue, nor caste, nor grade, Excludes the meanest from his share. 



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Then why should one the sceptre claim, And crush his brother to the earth ? 



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JNo star to guide, no ray of hope To shine upon the darksome gloom. 
And make our land, as it should be, A free and happy land indeed ? 



12 



Hymn 6, L, M, 

Words by Rev. Dr. Willard. 



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1. Let freeborn empires offer prayer, Lord, God of Hosts, around thy throne, 



2. Beneath the guardian eye of heaven, Th' unchanging rights of men we claim; 



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3. Let Afric's children, dear to God, Expire in galling chains no more ; 

4. Let reason guide each patriot band, And love exert her mild control ; 



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Our sires ih'oppressive yoke have riven, And mark'd our way to pow'r and fame. 



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Nor grasping av'rice, stain'd with blood, Columbia's elder sons devour. 
The tyrant yield to thy command, And freedom reign from pole to pole. 



13 



Hymn 7. L. M. 

Words by Heber. Music from " Carmina Sacra." 



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1 . The Lord will come ; the earth shall quake,The hills their lasting seat forsake, 



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2. The Lord will come; but not the same, As once in lowly form he came, 









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3. The Lord will come ; a dreadful form, With wreath of flame and robe of storm, 






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And with'ring from the vault of night, The stars withdrew their feeble light. 



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A silent lamb to slaughter led, The bruis'd, the sufT'ring, and the dead. 



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3. Then slaves and masters both shall find An equal judge of human kind. 
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Hymn 8, L, M, 



Written for the 1st of August, by Mary L. Gardner. 



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1. Is there one here within whose soul Lingers a spark of Freedom's fire,. 



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2. List Hist ! the wind exalting bears The thrilling note upon its wing j 



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3. Wake ! wake the chorus ! shall their shout Upon N.'England's hill-tops die, 

4. O, Father ! may thy word go forth, From India to .the western sea r 



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One, who would boast with honest pride The spirit of his patriot sire ? , 

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Eight hundred thousand ransom'd souls Th' inspiring song of freedom sing. 



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Where freedom first with trumpet tone Sent forth her wild and fearless cry? 
Till millions now in dreadful thrall, Can swell the anthem of the Free ; 



15 



Hymn 8, L. M, 



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One who would scorn the tyrant rod, The iron yoke, the . galling chain, 



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Long had they bow'd beneath the yoke, Long " welter'd in a living grave," 



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No ! let it ring o'er hill and vale, From Greenland to the southern plain, 
Till over Afric's sable race, No more is waved oppression's rod, — 



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Who will not swell the joyous song That comes to-day across the main ? 



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Their chains are broke, and Britain's isles Now bear no impress of a slave. 



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Where even now the soil is cursed By Slavery's dark and hateful stain. 
And man no longer dares for gold To sell the image of his God, 



16 



Hymn 9. L, M, 




Words by J. G- . Whittieb 

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1. thou whose presence went before Our fathers in their weary way, 

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2. We thank thee,Father, hill and plain Around us wave their fruits once more, 






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3. For those, to whom thy living word Of light and love is never given; 

4. And grant, O Father, that the time Of earth's deliv'rance may be near, 









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As with thy chosen mov'd of yore, The fire by night, the cloud by day; 

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And cluster'd vine,and blossom'd grain Are bending round each cottage door : 



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For those, whose ears have never heard The promise and the hope of heaven ; 
When every land, and tongue, and clime, The message of thy love shall hear, 



17 



Hymn 9, L, M, 



(Continued.) 



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When, from each, temple of the free, A nation's song ascends to heaven, 




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But Oh! for those this day can bring, Not, as to us, the joyful thrill ; 



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For broken heart,and clouded mind, Whereon no human mercies fall : — 
When suiitten,as with fire from heaven,The captive's chain shall sink in dust, 






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Most Holy Father, unto thee May not our humble prayer be given? 



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For those,who,under freedom's wing, Are bound in slavery's fetters 

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Oh ! be thy gracious love inclin'd, Who, as a Father, pitiest 
And to his fetter'd soul be given, The glorious freedom of the 
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18 

Hymn 10. C, M, 

Words et Mrs. Folhi. 



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1. What mean ye, thus to bruise and bind My creatures ? saith the Lord, 

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3. What mean ye, when God's bounteous hand To you so much has given, 

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And starve your brother's craving mind, Who asks to hear my word? 

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And shed,like rain upon your soil, His blood and bitter tears. 






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That from the Slave, who tills your land, You keep both earth and heaven? 
What mean ye to the Judge of all To answer in that day ? 



19 

Hymn 11, G, M, 

Words by Montgomery. 



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1. Daughter of sadness, from the dust Exalt thy fallen head, 



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2. Awake, awake, put on thy strength, Thy heautiful array; 






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3. Rebuild thy walls — thy bounds enlarge, And send thy heralds forth ; 



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In thy Redeemer firmly trust : He calls thee from the dead. • 






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The day of freedom dawns at length, The Lord's appointed day. 






Say to the South, " Give up thy charge, And keep not back, O North." 



20 



Hymn 12, C, M. 



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1. Oh, who shall see that joyful "day, When, high on glory's throne, 
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2. "When man no more shall dread the frown., That gloom'd the tyrant's brow, 






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3. See, see, already 'tis begun; Oris it but a dream? 

4. God speed, God speed the heav'n-born cause, O'er ev'ry land and sea, 






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Freedom shall rule, with sov'reign sway, And call the world her own ? 






And sorrow's cheerless night hath flown To climes unpeopled now. 



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The nations hail the rising sun, And catch the thrilling beam. 
Till all the world, with loud applause, Proclaims that Man is free. 



21 

Hymn 13, C. M, 



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1. Rise, Freemen, rise ! the call goes forth, Attend the high command- 
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2. Rise, free the slave ! oh burst his chains, And cast his fetters down 






3. Then shall the day at length arrive, When all shall equal be; 



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Obedience to the word of God Throughout this guilty land. 



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Words by Oliver Johnson. Music — Zion. 



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shame ; Let us now, the time redeeming, Press the helpless captive's claim. 



23 

Hymn 14, 

(Continued.) 



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Proud oppression Soon shall find a shameful grave. 



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Hymn 15, 8s & 7s, 




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1. See the ear of freedom speeding Onward with resistless force; 

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2. Lo, a brighter day is dawning On our country, on the world ; 




3. Rise N. 'England's sons and daughters, Put your shoulder to the wheel ; 

4. Soon shall ev'ry earth-bound nation See the sun of freedom rise ; 



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Hearts long-riven cease their mourning, Where thy banners are unfurl'd. 



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Jesus by example taught us For our neighbor's woes to feel : 

Vale and mount shall be. its station, Whither all shall turn their eyes. 



25 



Hymn 15, 

(Continued.) 



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Wave thy banners, Wave thy banners, 



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When shall cease the bondman's sighs. 



26 



Hymn 16. 8s & 7s. 



Words by Mary Jack man. 



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Life and health and comfort shedding O'er the shades of moral night. 



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27 

Hymn 16, 

(Continued.) 



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Hail it, Freemen, Hail it, Freemen, 'Tis the star of Liberty. 



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Hail it, Bondmen, Hail it, Bondmen, Slavery cannot bear its light. 






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Tremble, Tyrants, Tremble, Tyrants, Soon your cruel power will cease. 
Hail it, Christians, Hail it, Christians, Harbinger of better days. 



HYMN. 

From all that dwell below the skies, 
Let the Creator's praise arise : 
Let the Redeemer's name be sung 
Through every land, by every tongue. 

Eternal are thy mercies, Lord ; 

Eternal truth attends thy word : 

Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore, 

Till suns shall rise and set no more, 



28 

Hymn 17, 6s, & 4s. 

Tune — America. 



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1. My country ! 'tis of thee, Stronghold of slavery, Of thee I sing : 

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3. Let wailing swell the breeze, And ring from all the trees, The black man's wrong ; 

4. Our father's God ! to thee, Author of Liberty, To thee we sing ; 



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love thy hills and dales, Thy mounts and pleasant vales, 









Let every tongue awake, Let bond and free partake, 
Soon may our land be bright, With holy freedom's right, 



29 

Hymn 17, 

(Continued.) 





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From every mountain- side, Thy deeds shall ring. 




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But hate thy negro sales, As foulest sin. 

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Let rocks their 
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thy might, 



The sound prolong. 
Great God, our Kins:. 



(3*) 



HYMN. 

It comes, the joyful day, 
When tyranny's proud sway, 

Stern as the grave, 
Shall to the ground be hurl'd, 
And freedom's flag, unfurl'd, 
Shall wave throughout the world, 

O'er eYerj slave. 

Trump of glad jubilee ! 
Echo o'er land and sea 

Freedom for all. 
Let the glad tidings fly, 
And every tribe reply, 
" Glory to God on high," 

At Slavery's fall. A . G . DuNCAN 



30 



Hymn 18. 6s. & 4s. 

Words by W. L-. Garrison 



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1 . Ye who in bondage pine. Shut out from light divine. Bereft of hope. 

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2. Shout, for the hour draws nigh, That gives you liberty 



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From every limb — the strong No more the weak shall wrong, 



31 

Hymn 18, 

{Continued.) 



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Whose blood our glory stains, In gloom- who grope. 



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HYMN. 

Spirit of Freemen, wake ; 
No truce with Slavery make, 

Thy deadly foe ; 
In fair disguises dress'd, 
Too long hast thou caress'd 
The serpent in thy breast ; 

Now lay him low. 

Sons of the free ! we call 
On you, in field and hall, 

To rise as one ; 
Your heav'n-born rights maintain, 
Nor let oppression's chain . 
On human limbs remain ; 

Speak, and 'tis done, 






32 



Hymn 19. 6s & 4s, 

Words by John. Pieepont, 



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1 . With thy pure dews and rains, Wash out, O God, the stains, From Afric's shore ; 



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3. Hear'st thou, O God, those chains, That clank on Freedom's plains, By Christians wrought, 

4. Lord, wilt thou notj at last, From thine own image cast Away all cords, 



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And while her palm trees bud, Let not her children's blood, 



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Those, who these chains have worn, Christians from home have torn, 
Save thor of love, which brings Man from his long wanderings, 



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Hymn 19, 

(Continued.) 



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Christians have hither borne, Christians have bought. 

Back to the King of kings. The Lord of lords? 



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HYMN. 

Ye spirits of the free ! 
Can ye forever see 

Your brother man, 
A yok'd and tortur'd slave, 
Scourg'd to an early grave, 
And raise no hand to save, 

E'en when you can 1 

No ! at the battle-cry, 
A host, prepaid to die, 

Shall arm for fight ; 
But not with martial steel, 
Grasp'd with a murd'rous zeal ; 
Their foes no arms shall feel 

But love and light. 



34 



Hymn 20. S. M. 

Words bit Mrs, Sisournet. 



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2. To me he gave a form Of fairer, 






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3. The hue of deeds and thoughts He traces in his book, 

4. Not by the tinted cheek, That fades away so fast, 



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And spread the country of their birth Beneath a burning sky. 



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But am I, therefore, in his sight, Kespected more than they. 



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'Tis the complexion of the heart, On which he deigns to look. 
But by the color of the soul We must be judg'd at last. 



35 



Hymn 21, S, M, 

Words from Emancipator 



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How long shall slavery curse the earthy And mercy plead in vain. 



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Till all the world m love obey Their maker's righteous laws* 



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His praise to spread, to whom belongs All majesty and might. 



36 



Hymn 22, S, M. 

Words by Mrs. Sigourney 






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Bid our lov'd land the lesson learn, To' bid the slave he free. 

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37 

Hymn 23. 7s, 

Words et Mrs. Follen. 



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1. Lord deliver ; thou canst save; Save from evil, Mighty God ; 

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2. May the captive's pleading fill All the earth, and all the sky ; 



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4. Love to man and love to God, Are the weapons of our war \ 






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Hear, oh, hear the kneeling slave, Break, oh, break th'oppressor's rod. 

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Will regard the captive's prayer, Will from bondage set him free. 
These can break th'oppressor's rod, Burst the bonds that we abhor. 

(4) 



38 

Hymn 24, 7s, 

Words by-Miss Chandler. 
1. Daughters of the Pilgrim sires, Dwellers by their mould'ring- graves, 



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4. Oh! then save her from a doom, Worse than ought that ye may bear; 



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Watchers of their altar fires, Look upon your country's slaves. 



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That their aching hearts have prov'd, And refuse to send relief? 



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On whose limbs those fetters rest? 
'Midst her bondage and despair. 






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39 



Hymn 25. 7s. 

Words feoi-Zion's Watchman. 






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1. Hear us, Father while we cry, Pleading for an injur'd race; 

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3. Crush the system in the dust, Ere another year be past, 

4. Then will shrieks be turn'd to praise, As the gory whip departs ; 



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Make the bolts asunder fly, By thine own resistless grace; 

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J) very chain and fetter burst, Which have been around them cast. 
And the ransom'd daily raise, Songs of joy from grateful hearts, 



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Hymn 26, 7s, 

Words by W. H. Hayward 



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1. Holy Father, God of Love; Send thy spirit from above ; 

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Rend his fetters, set him free, Slave no longer let him be. 



41 



Hymn 27, 8s, & 7s, 

Words by W. L. Garrison. 



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4. Help us ev'ry chain to sever, Ev'ry captive to set free — 



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As the light from heaven proceeding, Chiefly dp we honor thee. 



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By thy grace, our whole behavior ! Shall be worthy of our head. 
And our guilty land deliver From the curse of slavery. 

(4*) 



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Hymn 28, 7s. & 6s, 

"Words ey Mary Ann- Collier.- 






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1. Land of my sleeping fathers ! O'er thee no chain is flung; 



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Through all thy verdant Tallies, 



The shout of joy is rung; 



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Is not thy name, my country ! 



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" Cast off thy fetters, brother ! Take back the gift of God," 

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43 

Hymn 28, 

• (Con t i n u e d. ) 






Wide o'er thy rolling rivers 

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Thy fair and sunny plains, 



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Are all the captive's loosen'd? . The fetter'd slave set 



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Swell high the shout of Freedom, And give it to the slave, 



44 



Hymn 29, 7s, & 6s. 



Words by C. W. Dennison. Tune — "From Greenland's Icy Mountains" 






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1. God of the wide creation— Of air, and earth and sea 






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2. And will the Lord of glory, Who dwells beyond the sky, 

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3. Then bless, Great God of heaven, The helpless, bleeding slave; 



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Accept the young oblation, We children bring to thee; 



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Regard our humble story, And answer from on high ? 

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Let light and truth be given, His darken'd soul to save; 



45 



Hymn 29. $ 

(CoNT INUE D . ) 



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We come, thy sons attending, And join our notes with theirs; 



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He will; for he hath told us In his eternal word, 



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And speed, good Lord, the season, When Slavery's reign shall end, 



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At mercy's footstool bending, We lift our youthful prayers. 



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He always doth behold us, His ears have ever heard. 



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And masters, sway'd by reason, Shall call the slave their friend. 



46 



Hymn 30. 7s. & 6s. 

Words f r o m F re e d o m 's Lyre 



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1. Soon shall the trump of Freedom, Resound from shore to shore; 



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2. Then tyrants' crowns and sceptres, And victors' wreaths and cars ; 

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Soon, taught by heavenly wisdom, Man shall oppress no more. 






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( CoNTlNTTED. ) 



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But ev'ry yoke be broken, Each captive soul set free. 



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Shall in the dust be trodden, Till time shall be no more; 

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And peace and joy from heaven The Lord on earth shall pour. 



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Ye Heralds of Freedom." 

Tune — " I would not live always." 



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That finger will soon lose the strength of its joint; 



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May now all oppose you, and victory is yours, 

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49 



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Ye Heralds of Freedom." 



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The banner of Jesus will soon be unfurled, 

His gracious protection will be to you given, 



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And he will give freedom and peace to the world. 
And bright crowns of glory he'll give you in heaven. 

(5) 



50 

"I would not live always." 

Written for the Anti-Slavery Melodies by John Pierpont. 



I would not live always ; I ask not to stay 
Where I must bear the burden and heat of the day; 
Where my body is cut with the lash or the cord, 
And a hovel and hunger are all my reward. 



I would not live always, where life is a load 

To the flesh and the spirit ; since there's an abode 

For the soul disenthralled, let me breathe my last breath, 

And repose in thine arms, my deliverer death. 

3 

I would not live always, to toil as a slave ; 

O no ; let me rest, though I rest in my grave ; 

For there, from their troubling the wicked shall cease, | 

And, free from his master, the slave be at peace. 



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Now's the day and now's the hour." 

Harriet Martineau. 

1. Now's the day and now's the hour! 
Freedom is our nation's dower, 
Put we forth a nation's power 

Struggling to be free! 
Raise your front the foe to daunt! 
Bide no more the snare, the taunt ! 
Peal to highest heaven the chant, — 
" Law and Liberty." 



i( Now's the day and now's the hour. 

(Continued.) 

2. Gather like the muttering storm ! 
Wake your thunders for reform ! 
Bear not, like the trodden worm, 

Scorn and mockery! 
Waking from their guilty trance, 
Shrink the foes as storms advance 
Scathed beneath a nation's glance, 

Where's their bravery 1 

3. Waves on waves compose the main, 
Mountains rise by grain on grain, 
Men an empire's might sustain* 

Knit in unity ! 
Who shall check the ocean tide .? 
Who o'erthrow the mountain's pride 1 
Who a nation's strength deride, 

Spurning slavery ? 

4. Hearts in mutual faith secure,, 
Hands from spoil and treachery pure, 
Tongues that meaner oaths abjure, 

These shall make us free ! 
Bend the knee, and bare the brow ! 
God, our guide, will hear us now ! 
Peal to highest heaven the vow, 

" Law and Liberty/' 



29 



52 



Hymn 34, 7s, & 6s, 

Words from Freedom's Lyre. Tune — "Scots wha hae." 



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1. Children of the glorious dead, Who for freedom fought and bled, 



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2. This is proud oppression's hour, Storms assail you, will you cow'r, 



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3. Never ! by your country's shame, Never ! by a Savior's claim; 



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With her banner o'er you spread, On to victory; 

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While beneath a despot's power, Groans the suff'ring slave 



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To the men of ev'ry name, Whom he died to save ; 



53 



Hymn 34. 

(Continued.) 



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Not for stern ambition's prize, Let your hopes or wishes rise, 



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While on ev'ry southern gale, Comes the helpless captive's tale, 

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Onward, then, ye fearless band, Heart to heart, and hand to hand ; 



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Lo! your leader from the skies, Bids you do, or die, 

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Comes a voice of woman's wail, And of man's despair? 



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Yours shall be the Christian's stand, Or the martyr's grave. 

(5*) 



54 



Hymn 32. 



Words by E. M. Chandler. 










1. Christian mother, when thy prayer Trembles on the twilight air, 



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2. Christian daughter, sister, wife, Ye who wear a guarded life, 



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3. Blest ones, whom no hands on earth Dare to wrench from home and hearth, 



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And thou askest God to keep, In their waking and their sleep, 



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Ye, whose bliss hangs not, thank God, On a tyrant's word or nod, 



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Ye, whose hearts are shelter 'd well, By affection's holy spell, 



55 



Hymn 32, 

(Continued.) 



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Those, whose love is more to thee Than the wealth of land or sea ; 



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Will ye hear, with careless eye, Of the wild despairing cry, 



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Oh, forget not those., for whom Life is nought but changeless gloom, 



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Rising up from human hearts, As their latest bliss departs? 



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O'er whose days, so woe-begone, Hope may paint no brighter dawn. 



56 

Hymn 33, 

Written for the Anti-Slavery Melodies by Claudius Bradford. 




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1 . Behold, behold, how earth and sky Are green and bright 



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2. Hark how the birds their gentle notes Of freedom raise ; 






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3. Shall mercy's tears no longer flow ? Can pity die ? 



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How spring and summer seems to vie, To yield delight, 



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How all around the anthem floats Of prayer and praise; 

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Can man forget his brother's wo, And woman's sigh? 



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57 

Hymn 33. 

(Continued.) 



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But ah! there's something dims it all, And checks my verse ; 



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But ah ! there's something, something jars, With horrid tone ; 



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Oh no! while reason holds her seat, And life remains, 



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That hangs o'er nature's face its pall, 'Tis slavery's curse. 



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And all the lovely music mars; 'Tis slavery's groan. 

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We'll pledge our highest efforts yet To rend his chains. 



58 



« Who in God's sight is holy," 

.Written for the Anti- Slavery Melodies. 
By Miss Almira Seymour. Tune — "Morning light is breaking." 

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1. Who in God's sight is holy ? What lips shall dare to pray, 

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2, Shall lips breathe forth His praises, That, in their impious pride, 



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3. Forbid it, blest Religion ! 

4. Chase from thy holy temple, 



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All which ensnares, deceives, 



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Our Father ! let thy kingdom Be hastened on its way ? 



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Contema His sacred image, And mercy's claims deride? 



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And, Father! forgive them, They know not what they do. 
And let thy house, no longer, Be as a den of thieves ; 



59 



"Who in God's sight is holy." 



(Continued.) 



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Shall hands, that forge the fetters, Which clasp the living' limb, 



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Shall tongues exhort to virtue The erring steps of 



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O, purify thy churches, Throughout this sinful land; 

Fill it with thy own presence, Life-giving as thou art, 



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Stained with a brother's life-blood, Be raised in prayer to Him ? 

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Millions of souls condemn? 



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Let justice, truth and mercy Beside thy altar stand. 
Till largest love becometh, The life of every heart. 



60 



The Anti-Slavery Call, 

Tune — " When I can read my title clear. 1 









1. Come join the Abolitionists, ye young men bold and strong 
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2. Come join &c. 



Ye men of riper years, 






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3. Come join &c. — 

4. Come join &c. — 



Ye dames and maidens fair, 
Ye sons and daughters all 



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And with a warm and cheerful zeal, Come help the cause along.. 



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And save your wives and children dear, From grief and bitter tears. 



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And breathe around us in our path, Affection's nallowed air. 
Of this our own America, Come at the friendly call. 



61 



Anti-Slavery Call, 

(Continued.) 



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Come help the cause along, 



Come help the cause along, 



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From grief and 



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bitter tears, From grief and bitter 



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Affection's hallowed air, Affection's hallowed] air, 

Come at the friendly call, Come at the friendly call, 



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And with a warm and cheerful zeal, Come help the cause along : 

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And save your wives and children dear, From grief and bitter tears, 






And breathe around us in our path, Affection's hallowed air. 

Of this our own America, Come at the friendly call. 

(6) 



62 



Anti-Slavery Call. 



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(Continued. ) 

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that will be joyful, joyful, 



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O that will be joyful, joyful, joyful, 

O that will be joyful, joyful, joyful, 



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that will be joyful 



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When slavery is no more, When slavery is no more; 



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When slavery is no more, When slavery is no more; I 



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When woman cheers us 
When all shall proudly 



on, When woman cheers us 
say, This, this is Freedom's 



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day, 



63 



Anti-Slavery Call. 

(Continue d.) 



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no more, 'Tis then we'll sing and 

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When slavery 

no more, ? Tis then we'll sing and * 



When slavery 

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To conquests not yet won, 'Tis then we'll sing and 

Oppression flee away ! 'Tis then we'll sing and 



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offerings bring, When 



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offerings bring, When 

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offerings bring, When woman cheers us on. 

offerings bring, When freedom wins the day. 



64) 



" Lo the bondage of ages has ceased." 

Written for the 1st of August By W. L. Garrison. 






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1. Lo the bondage of ages has ceased, The chains of the tyrant are riven' 







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2. Lo ! the gloom and the blackness of night, Have suddenly vanished away, 



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3. Hark ! a voice from the isles of the sea; Its echoes are heard round the world 

4. Columbia ! shame on thee now ! Repent thee in ashes and dust ; 



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No more as a chattel or beast, Shall man to his labor be driven, 



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And all things rejoice in the light, Of Freedom's meridian day. 



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O ! joyful its message—" We're free !" To the dust oppression is hurled ; 
There is blood on thy hands, on thy brow, And thou art by slavery cursed ; 



65 



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Lo the bondage of ages has ceased 



55 



( C ONTINUE D. ) 



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Where the groans and the shrieks of despair, From heart-broken victims were heard, 



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Restored to their sight fc are the blind, 



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We are free as the waves of the deep, 
Thy millions of vassals set free, 



As the winds that sweep o'er the earth, 
Away with the scourge and the rod, 



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Songs of rapturous joy fill the air, More sweet than the notes of the bird. 



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All who seek may with certainty find, For clear is the vision of all. 



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And therefore we jubilee . keep, And hallow the day of our birth. 
Then join with the isles of the sea, In a shout of thanksgiving to God. 

(6*) 



66 



The Trumpet of Freedom. 

Words from A. S. Standard. 



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1. Hark! hark! to the trumpet of freedom, Her rallying signal she blows, 

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2. Hurra for the old fashioned doctrine, 



That men are created all free ; 



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Come gather around her broad banner, And battle 'gainst liberty's foes. 



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We ever will boldly maintain it 



Nor care who the tyrant may be. 



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67 



The Trumpet of Freedom. 



(Continue d 



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Our forefathers plighted their honor, Their lives and their property too, 




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We're foes unto wrong and oppression, No matter which side of the sea; 



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To maintain, in defiance of Britain, Their principles righteous and true. 




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And ever intend to oppose them, Till all of God's image are free. 



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68 



"The world from its trance is awaking," 

1. Oh the world from its trance is awaking, With the spring of regenerate youth, 

2. Hark ! a voice to the nations hath spoken, In tones that have startled the world. 






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And the error-freed people are slaking Their thirst at the fountain of truth. 



Let the dark chain of error be broken, Let Liberty's flag be unfurled. 



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69 



"The world from its trance is awaking." 



(Continued.) 



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Oh ! the canker-worm, custom, was eating Its way through the vein of the age, 

For time and progressive opinion, Shall conquer where cohorts shall fail, 
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Till man like the wild-bird, seemed beating His breast on the bars of the cage. 
And freedom assert her dominion; Hail Freedom, Hail Freedom, all hail. 



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70 



Song of the Abolitionist. 

Words by W. L. Garrison. Tune—" Old Lang Syne." 



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1. I am an 



Abolitionist ! 



I glory in the name; 



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2. I am an Abolitionist ! Then urge me not to pause, 



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3. I am an Abolitionist! Oppression's deadly foe; 

4.1 am an Abolitionist! No threats shall awe my soul ; 



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Though now by slavery's minions hissed, And covered o'er with shame; 



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For joyfully do I enlist In Freedom's sacred cause; 


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In God's great strength will I resist, And lay the monster low ; 
No perils cause me to desist, No bribes my acts control ; 



71 



Song of the Abolitionist. 

(Continued.) 



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It is a spell of light and power, The watch-word of the free ; 



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nobler strife the world ne'er saw, Th'enslaved to disenthral 



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In God's great name do I demand, To all be freedom given, 
A freeman will I live and die, In sunshine and in shade, 



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Who spurns it in the trial-hour, A 



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craven soul is he. 



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soldier for the war, Whatever may befall. 



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That peace and joy may fill the land, And songs go up to heaven. 
And raise my voice for liberty, Of nought on earth afraid. 



12 

Freedom's Banner, 

W o rds byR.C.Waterston. 
1. My country, shall thy honored name Be as a by-word through the world ? 

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2. That flag, my country, I had thought, From noble sires was given to thee, 



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3. The mighty dead that flag unrolled, They bathed it in the heaven's own blue. 

4. Oh, by the virtues of our sires, And by the soil on which they trod, 
5 Arouse ! and let each hill and glen With prayer to the high heavens ring out 



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Rouse ! for (as if to blast thy fame,) This keen reproach is at thee hurled, 







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By the best blood of patriots bought, To wave alone above the Free ! 






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They sprinkled stars upon each fold, And gave it as a trust to you; 
And by the trust their name inspires, And by the hope we have in God, 
Till all our land, with free-born men, May join in one triumphant shout, 



Freedom's Banner, 



(Continued.) 



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" The banner that above thee waves, Is floating o'er three million slaves." 

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Yet now, while to the breeze it waves, It floats above three million slaves. 



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And now that glorious banner waves, In shame, above three million slaves. 
Arouse, my country, and agree To set thy captive children free. 
That freedom's banner does not wave Its fold above a single slave. 



(?) 



74 



" The Pilgrims are launched &c," 

Written for the Anti-Slavery Melodies by Henry Ware, Jr 

Tune— "The wild hunt of Lxjtzow." 









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1. The Pilgrims are launched on the wild winter main, Their bark on the 




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2. Borne high on the breath of the soft summer gale, The slave ship is 

3» In the darkness and rnin of the chill autumn night, The slave from the 
4. Up, up with your banners to honor the brave ! O'er your forefathers' 









foam madly tossing: The tempest is high; but its threats they disdain ; 



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proudly careering. 



What sights of despair, and what voices of wail ! 






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cane-fields is striding; Thro' hunger and hardship he urges his flight, 
tombs be they flying ! And hail to the hero, tho' black and a slave, 



75 



" The Pilgrims are launched &c." 



(C ONTINUED.) 



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They are fleeing from tyranny's sceptre and chain, It is Liber- 

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What anguish and madness beneath that fair sail, To hopeless cap 



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Nor perils dismay him, nor blood-hounds affright, By the North-star 
"Who shrinks from oppression, but fears not the grave, And throws off his 






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ty's sea they are crossing. Hark ! loud rings their cry o'er the stormy wave,. 



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steering 



Hark ! hark, from the black hold the stifled cry, 



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his weary feet guiding. Help ! help for him ! answer his earnest cry ! 
fetters by dying. Join, join in the shout that he flings on high, 



76 



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The Pikrims are launched &c, 



5? 



(Continued.) 



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Freedom ! Death or Freedom ! Freedom, or ocean our grave !' 






" Freedom ! Death or Freedom !" Hear how it pierces the sky ! 



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" Freedom ! Freedom ! Freedom !" Tell him that rescue is nigh ; 
"Freedom! Death or Freedom!" Join ;— 'twas your Forefathers' cry; 



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" Death or Freedom! Freedom! or 



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Death or Freedom!" Hear how it 



pierces 




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the sky. 

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« Freedom ! Freedom !" Tell him that rescue is nigh. 

"Death or Freedom!" Join ;— 'twas your Forefathers' cry. 



77 



The Slave at Midnight. 

Words by Professor Longfellow 



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1. Loud he sang the psalm of David, He a negro and enslaved, 



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2. And the voice of his devotion, Filled my soul with strange emotion, 

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3. Paul and Silas, in their prison, Sang of Christ, the Lord arisen, 

4. But, alas, what holy angel, Brings the slave this glad evangel, 



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Sang of Israel's 

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viciory, Sang of Zion bright and free, 

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For its tones by turns were glad, Sweetly solemn, wildly sad. 



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And the earthquake's arm of might Broke their dungeon gates at night. 

And what earthquake's arm of might Breaks his dungeon gates at night ? 
(7#\ o 8 c 



78 



"Arouse, New-England's Sons," 



Written for the Anti-Slavery Melodies by Miss M. L. Gardner. 






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1. Arouse, New-England's sons, arouse ! Wake from your coward sleep, 



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2. Arouse, New-England's sons, arouse ! A clinging curse on thee ! 

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3. Free ! while the halls ye rear are burned ? Free ! while your sons are driven 

4. Arouse, New-England's sons, arouse ! And lay oppression low, 



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The tyrant's hand is on your neck, And shall his fetters keep, 



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If here supinely ye will sleep, Dreaming that ye are free. 



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By slavery's mobs, because they dare To speak for truth and heaven ? 
And strike for freedom and for God, An earnest manly blow. 



79 



" Arouse, New-England's Sons," 



(Continued.) 



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In bondage, men whom freedom nursed, In her own chosen home? 
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Arouse, and see how false the name, Which ye so fondly claim, 



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Free ! while the very homes you've made Beside your fathers graves, 
Nail up your banner to the wall, In God's name let it wave, 



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Where patriot's blood was freely poured In holy 



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Free are ye ! while ye bear about The tyrants' galling chain 



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Are pillaged if ye dare to aid The panting, flying slave? 
Until beneath its ample folds Shall crouch no wretched slave. 



80 



"Spirit of Freedom, awake," 



Tune-—" Lady, sweet lady." 






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O Freedom, sweet Freedom, O Freedom, sweet Freedom, return, returr 






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Thy stars are dim, thy light is gone, Thy stars are dim, thy light u 

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Thy stars are dim, thy light is gone. 



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81 



"Spirit of Freedom, awake," 



(Continued.) 



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gone. 



This hour's for thee, for thee alone, hear our prayers. 



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Spirit of Freedom, awake, awake 



Sound the loud trump of Jubilee. 



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82 



"Spirit of Freedom, awake." 



(Continued.) 



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Till, at its note, the nation shake, And proclaim the captive free. 



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awake, awake. 



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83 



« Spirit of Freedom, awake," 



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(Continued.) 






Fa la la lal la la fa la la la 



Fa la la lal la la la 









Fa la lal la fa la la 



fa la la la la 



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84 



" Come all who claim the Freeman's name," 

Written for the Anti-Slavery Melodies by James H. Wilder. 

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1. Come all who claim the freeman's name, Come join in earnest song : 



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2. From " British yoke and galling chain" Our fathers loosed the land— 






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3. Sons of the free ! shall these things be Where th'eagle's scream is heard 

4. While justice, honor, mercy, love, Are aught but empty sounds, 

5. On this fair land let freedom stand, And wide her banner wave, 

6. O God of love! look from above In mercy on the slave. 



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In freedom's praise your voices raise, 



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And loud the strain prolong. 



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But other yokes and bonds remain, 



Their sons with shame to brand. 



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Beneath a sky where gleams the eye 



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Of freedom's mountain bird? 
We'll strive foul slavery's curse to drive Beyond our nations' bounds. 
Nor ever be our blood-bought soil, Her hapless, hopeless grave. 
Let blessed peace bring his release, Let truth be strong to save. 



85 



" Come all who claim the Freeman's name," 



(Continued.) 



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Ring out the shout, the land throughout, No room be here for craven doubt, 



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For chains and bars and whips and scarsNow mingle with Columbia's stars. 



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Shall former emblems only be The epitaphs of Liberty? 

For right we'll fight, with all our might, While truth sheds down her full clear light 

While beams the star that shews the North, While bondmen dream of freedom's worth, 

When comes the day, as come it must, That chains shall crumble into dust, 



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In trust arouse, with truthful vows, Arouse, arouse- 



arouse. 



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To change for shame her banner's fame, For shame, for shame, for shame. 






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' Then thunder no ! let th'outcry go, Oh no ! 

-"Let all be free." the cry shall be. Be free, 

They'll flee away, at rest to stay, Away, 

We'll all hurra, both near and far, Hurra, 



oh no ! 
be free, 
away, 
hurra. 



oh no! 
be free, 
away, 
hurra. 



86 

" Oppression shall not always reign," 

Written for the Anti-Slavery Melodies, by Henry Ware, Jr. 

I. Oppression shall not always reign ; 

There comes a brighter day, 
When Freedom, burst from every chaiin r 

Shall have triumphant way. 
Then Right shall over Might prevail, 
And Truth, like hero armed in mail, 
The hosts of tyrant wrong assail, 

And hold eternal sway. 

2. E'en now that glorious day draws near, 

Its coming is not far ; 
In Earth and Heaven its signs appear ; 

We see its morning star ; 
Its dawn has flushed the Eastern sky ; 
The Western hills reflect it high ; 
The Southern clouds before it fly ; 

Hurra, hurra, hurra I 

8. It flashes on the Indian Isles, 

So long to bondage given ; 
Their faded plains are decked in smiles,, 

Their blood-stained fetters riven. 
Eight hundred thousand newly free 
Four out them songs of Jubilee, 
That shake the globe from sea to sea, 

As with a shout from heaven. 

4. That shout, which every bosom thrills, 

Has crossed the wondering main ; 
It rings in thunder from our hills, 

And rolls o'er every plain. 
The waves reply on every shore ; 
Old Fanueil echoes to the roar, 
And rocks as ne'er it rocked before, 

And never rocks in vain. 



87 

"Oppression shall not always reign," 

{continued.) 

5. What voice shall bid the progress stay 

Of Truth's victorious car ? 
What arm arrest the growing day, 

Or quench the solar star? 
What dastard soul, though stout and strong., 
Shall dare bring back the ancient wrong, 
Or Slavery's guilty night prolong, 

And Freedom's morning bar ? 

36. The Tiour of triumph comes apace, 

The fated, promised, hour, 
When earth upon a ransomed race 

Her bounteous gifts shall shower. 
Ring, Liberty, thy glorious bell ! 
Bid high thy sacred Banner swell ! 
Let trump on trump the triumph tell 

"Of Heaven's avenging power ! 

X The Day has eome 1 tbe Hour draws nigh I 
We hear the coming car ! 
Send forth the glad exulting cry] 

* Hurra, hurra, hurra ! 
From every hill, by every sea, 
In shouts proclaim the Great Decree, 
£i All chains are broke, all men are free i " 
Hurra, hurra, hurra! 



88 



"Oft- in the chilly night." 

Written for the Anti-Slavery Melodies by John Fierpont. 
Tune — "Oft in the stilly night." 



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1. Oft in 



the chilly night, Ere slumber's chain has bound me, 

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2. When at the driver's call, In cold or 



sultry 



weather, 



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When all her silvery light The moon is pouring round me, 
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We slaves, both great and small, Turn out to 



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89 



« Oft in the chilly night" 



(Continue d.) 






Beneath the ray, I kneel and pray That God would give some token, 



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I feel like one, From whom the sun Of hope has long departed ; 



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That slavery's chains, On Southern plains, Shall all ere long he broken. 



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And morning's light, And weary night Still find me broken-hearted. 



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90 



« Oft in the chilly night," 

(Continue d .) 






9 9 — ra ra ra — r-a 1 =- 



Yes, in the 



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chilly night, Though slavery's chain has bound me, 



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p: 



r s — s — k 



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Thus, when the chilly breath Of night is sighing round me, 



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fie—el-* 

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Kneel I, and feel the might Of God's right arm around me. 



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Kneel I, and wish that death In his cold chain had bound me. 



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sssis 



91 



New England, Awake! 

Words by J. G. Whittier. Music— by S. S. Wardwell, 



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—a ' — r-rr-p—^-r- — c~ twzzmzzrz: tczx c:__t: 




1. Pride of 



New England! 



is: 



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Soul of our fathers ! 



2. Back with the Southerner's 



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Padlocks and scourges, 



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3. Up to our altars, then, Haste we and summon 

4. If we have whispered truth, Whisper no longer ; 



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Shrink we all craven-like, When the storm gathers ? 



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Go — let him fetter down Ocean 



free surges ! 



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Gourage and loveliness, Manhood and woman ! 

Speak as the tempest does, Sterner and stronger. 



The small notes in the second bar to be sung with the 2d, 3d, and 4th verses. 



92 



New England, Awake, 



(Continued.) 



1 1 p r r 



-\ r 

What tbo' the tempest 



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be Over us 



lowering, 



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Go — let him silence Winds, clouds and waters, 



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Deep let our_ pledges be: Freedom 

Still be the tones of truth Louder 



forever ! 
and firmer, 



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1 



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& '-- ' — H : S : 

Where's the New-Englander Shamefully 



cowering < 



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Never 



New-E norland's own Free sons and daughters ! 



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Truce with ^ oppression, Never, oh ! never. 

Startling the haughty South With the deep murmur. 



93 



New-England, awake! 

(Continued.) 



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HIS? 



Graves green and holy 



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Around us are lying, 



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Free as 



Ocean-ward 



going, 






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By our own birth-right gift, Granted of heaven, 
God and our charter's right, Freedom forever. 



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Free were the sleepers all, Living and dying. 



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JC 



Free as the breezes 



Over 



us 



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blowing. 



it 



: S-5— S — S : 



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Freedom for heart and lip, Be the pledge given. 

Truce with oppression, Never, oh! never. 



94 



Ode for the Fourth of July, 

Words from the Anti-Slavery Standard 






r - M t - 



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1. Hark how the loud, deep cannon's roar, Insults the peaceful dawn, 



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2. A country vowed to 



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liberty, And vowed to slavery too, 






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3. Let the day see the pageant show, Ploat banners to the breeze, 
4. Yes, rally brave America, Thy noble hearts and free, 



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And beat of drums and chime of bells Marshals the early morn. 



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And striving with a half-way soul To do and to undo. 



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Bid liberty all hail ! throughout Columbia's lands and seas. 

Around the eagle as he soars — Sunward— in majesty. 



95 



Index. 



Fage. 

Arouse, Now England's sons, arouse, 78 

Blow ye the trumpet abroad o'er the sea, - 6 

Behold, behold, how earth and sky, - - - 56 

Christian Mother, when thy prayer, - - - 54 

Children of the glorious dead, - 52 

Come, join "the Abolitionists, 60 

Come, all who claim a freeman's name, - - - 84 

Daughter of sadness, from the dust, - - - 19 

Daughters of the Pilgrim sires, - - - - 38 

Eternal Father, thou hast made, - - - - 11 

From all that dwell below the skies, 27 

God gave to Africa's sous, - - 34 

God of the wide creation, - - - - 44 

Harkl it is the trumpet call, - 10 

Hark ! a voice from heaven proclaiming, - - - 22 

How long shall Afric r s sons, - - - - 35 

Hear us, Father, while we cry, - - - - 39 

Holy Father, God of love, 40 

Hark ! hark L the trumpet of Freedom, 66 

Hark ! how the loud, deep cannon's roar, 94 

Is there one here within whose soul, - - - 14 

It comes, the joyful day, 29 

I would not live always, 50 

I am an Abolitionist, ----- 70 

Let free-born empires offer prayer, - - - - 12 

Lord deliver, thou canst save, - 37 

Land of rny sleeping fathers, - 42 

Lo ! the bondage of ages has ceased, 64 

JLoud he sang the psalm of David, 77 

My country, 'tis of thee, - - - - - 28 

My country shall thy honored name, - - - 72 

Now r s the day, and now 's the hour, 51 



96 

O thou whose presence went before, 

Oh, who shall see that joyful day, - 

Oh, the world from its trance is awaking, - 

O Freedom, sweet Freedom, 

Oppression shall not always reign, - 

Oft in the chilly night, - 

Pride of New England, - 

Rise, Freemen, rise, the call goes forth, 

Strike from that laborer's limbs his chains, - 

See the car of freedom speeding, - 

See yon glorious star ascending, 

Spirit of freemen, wake, 

Saviour, though by scorn requited, - 

Soon shall the trump of freedom, - 

The hour of freedom come it must, 

The Lord will come, the earth shall quake, - 

This day doth music rare, - 

The Pilgrims are launched on the wild winter main, 

We ask not that the slave should lie, 

What mean ye thus to bruise and bind, 

With thy pure dews and rains, 

Who in God's sight is holy, 

Ye who in bondage pine, - 

Ye spirits of the free, 

Ye heralds of freedom, ye noble and brave. 



Note. — -The tunes selected from the "Carmina Sacra, " and the 
Boston Academy/' were selected by permission of the publisher. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



■II 

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